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  • Material Study | 3DeFX+ Active Insulation
  • Will Watters
  • ApparelLABMountain Life

Material Study | 3DeFX+ Active Insulation

Insulation


As the weather cools, we rely on insulated garments such as down jackets or synthetics to keep us warm.  Invented in 1936 and patented in 1940 by Eddie Bauer, the down jacket has been a staple of warmth for more than 75 years.  Garments like down and synthetic jackets work to insulate the body by trapping air between the fibers or feathers traditionally quilted or baffled in compartments of the jacket.  This, combined with a high density interior and exterior fabric make for a highly functional and technical jacket.
  • TLDR: Warmth without weight by trapping air between fibers or feathers.   

Limitations of Traditional Insulation


The problems with traditional down or synthetic jackets arise when you become active.  Whether you are hiking, biking, or just running to catch the subway, your body temperature rises and traditional jackets start to feel stuffy and uncomfortable.  This is because traditional down and synthetic jackets require high-density fabric to stop the feathers or fill from migrating through the face of the fabric.  These fabrics do not allow the jacket to breathe, and therefore all moisture and heat is trapped inside of the jacket, and do not allow for any stretch or movement.
  • TLDR: Due to fabric and fill restraints, traditional insulated jackets do not breathe and become stuffy with activity

Comparison With Other Insulation Products

Western Rise AirLoft Quilted Jacket



A Breakthrough in Lightweight, Breathable Insulation


Toray Mills in Japan set out on a mission to update insulation, and succeeded with their 3DeFX+.  The beauty of Toray’s 3DeFX+ lies in it’s heat retention, compact volume, and it’s unique dynamic stretch.  Toray’s 3DeFX+ utilizes 4 types of multi-denier, hollow-core, spiral yarns to create a proprietary insulation that not only allows for incredible breathability and excellent stretch and recovery, but is also thermobuffering to regulate temperature with a dense loft to trap more air.  The fiber matrix allows for 360 degree stretch without fiber migration through fabric. This allows the interior and exterior fabrics to also have stretch and breathable compositions..  Overall, this unique insulation creates a warmer, more breathable jacket built for active lifestyles, unlike anything else on the market.

 

Toray’s 3DeFX+ Properties

  • Highly Breathable - a highly breathable insulation paired with breathable interior and exterior fabrics create a system able to adjust with your body temperature and active lifestyles.
  • No Fiber Migration - a proprietary yarn matrix creates a fill with no fiber migration allowing it to be paired with more breathable fabrics.
  • 360 Degree Stretch - a blend of four spiral yarns creates insulation with excellent stretch and recovery.
  • Thermo-buffering/Temperature Regulating - 4 types of multi-denier, hollow-core, spiral yarns work together to act like a wool, creating a higher loft to trap more air, while still remaining highly breathable.
  • Hydrophobic - Water-resistant fibers repel moisture and will retain their warmth and loft even when wet.



The Western Rise AirLoft Quilted Jacket pairs 60gsm 3DeFx+ through the body and 40gsm 3DeFx+ through the sleeves with a lightweight, breathable, 4-way stretch interior fabric, and an innovative new water and wind resistant, 4-way stretch, breathable exterior fabric to create the perfect jacket for outdoor, travel, and everyday.

 

Western Rise Product With 3DeFX Technology

AirLoft Quilted Jacket

 

Western Rise AirLoft Quilted Jacket

  • Will Watters
  • ApparelLABMountain Life

Comments on this post ( 2 )

  • Oct 19, 2017

    Hey Rich –
    To answer your questions:

    1. You can see studies that Toray ran here:
    http://www.3defx-plus.com/

    2. No jacket is truly waterproof, but it is certainly compatible with 2L and 3L shells. Most membranes would defeat the purpose of this fabric, but there are a few stretch, breathable membranes that would work.

    Happy to dive deeper and share more studies. Just shoot me an email at: will (at) westernrise.com

    — Will Watters - Western Rise

  • Oct 19, 2017

    Two questions:
    1) Can you direct me to independent scientific research comparing this to other insulations?
    2) Is this new insulation going to be compatible with waterproof fabrics in addition to “water resistant”?
    Thanks!

    — Rich Berger

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